Pitot-Static System / RVSM

Pitot-Static System / RVSM

Vera Aviation & Touch and Go Aeroworks, South Florida’s premier Pitot/Static and Transponder testing repair station. We have been specializing in mobile FAR 91.411 and 91.413 tests, troubleshooting and repairs on general aviation and business jet aircraft. We can send our specialized equipment and highly trained technician directly to your aircraft, saving you time and money. Vera Aviation & Touch and Go Aeroworks is an FAA approved certified repair station, we are within a convenient range to service many airports in the greater South Florida area.

Vera Aviation & Touch and Go Aeroworks performs pitot static and transponder testing on all general aviation aircraft.  We are authorized by the FAA to perform RVSM (Reduced Vertical Separation Minimums) tests and inspections of air data computers and their associated systems.  TCAS compliance testing is also available. All of these capabilities are mobile and we have available the latest test equipment required for RVSM compliance.

IFR Certification Per CFR 91.411

We are able to certify and adjust Altimeters, Static Systems, Altitude Encoders, Airspeed Indicators, Vertical Speed Indicators and other precision pressure sensing instruments.  All work is accomplished by an FAA certified repairman with AP-IA (not all repair stations use certified mechanics). We also specialize in experimental aircraft certifications.

Inspections Required for IFR operations:

Transponder, altimeter, static system and automatic altitude encoder must be inspected and certified every 24 months in accordance with the requirements of CFR Parts 91.411 and 91.413

  • The altimeter is removed for bench testing where it is subjected to various tests to ensure accuracy (Part 43 Appendix E).
  • Data correspondence between automatically reported pressure altitude encoder data and the pilot’s altitude reference is checked and adjusted.
  • Static system leak check is accomplished to ensure a leak free system (Part 23.1325).
  • Transponder tested for proper operation (Part 43 Appendix F)

High Accuracy RVSM Pitot-Static System Test Equipment:

Our  “State of the Art” test equipment includes a high accuracy DFW Instruments Corporation DPST-8000M Digital RVSM Compliant Pitot-Static test set and ZSAY-3 static system adapter.

Altitude Performance (NIST Traceable)Range: -1,500 ft. to 55,000 ft.Resolution: 1 ft.

Accuracy:

±2 ft. @ 0 ft.

±5 ft. @ 35,000 ft.

±12 ft. @ 55,000 ft.

Airspeed PerformanceRange: 10 to 600 KnotsResolution: 0.1 Knots

Accuracy:

±0.5 Knots@ 20 knots

±0.05 Knots @ 600 knots

DFW Corp. DPST-8000M                            Static System Adapter

CFR  ref’s:

§ 91.411   Altimeter system and altitude reporting equipment tests and inspections.

(a) No person may operate an airplane, or helicopter, in controlled airspace under IFR unless—

(1) Within the preceding 24 calendar months, each static pressure system, each altimeter instrument, and each automatic pressure altitude reporting system has been tested and inspected and found to comply with appendices E and F of part 43 of this chapter;

(2) Except for the use of system drain and alternate static pressure valves, following any opening and closing of the static pressure system, that system has been tested and inspected and found to comply with paragraph (a), appendix E, of part 43 of this chapter; and

(3) Following installation or maintenance on the automatic pressure altitude reporting system of the ATC transponder where data correspondence error could be introduced, the integrated system has been tested, inspected, and found to comply with paragraph (c), appendix E, of part 43 of this chapter.

(b) The tests required by paragraph (a) of this section must be conducted by—

(1) The manufacturer of the airplane, or helicopter, on which the tests and inspections are to be performed;

(2) A certificated repair station properly equipped to perform those functions and holding—

(i) An instrument rating, Class I;

(ii) A limited instrument rating appropriate to the make and model of appliance to be tested;

(iii) A limited rating appropriate to the test to be performed;

(iv) An airframe rating appropriate to the airplane, or helicopter, to be tested; or

(3) A certificated mechanic with an airframe rating (static pressure system tests and inspections only).

(c) Altimeter and altitude reporting equipment approved under Technical Standard Orders are considered to be tested and inspected as of the date of their manufacture.

(d) No person may operate an airplane, or helicopter, in controlled airspace under IFR at an altitude above the maximum altitude at which all altimeters and the automatic altitude reporting system of that airplane, or helicopter, have been tested.

§ 91.413   ATC transponder tests and inspections.

(a) No persons may use an ATC transponder that is specified in 91.215(a), 121.345(c), or §135.143(c) of this chapter unless, within the preceding 24 calendar months, the ATC transponder has been tested and inspected and found to comply with appendix F of part 43 of this chapter; and

(b) Following any installation or maintenance on an ATC transponder where data correspondence error could be introduced, the integrated system has been tested, inspected, and found to comply with paragraph (c), appendix E, of part 43 of this chapter.

(c) The tests and inspections specified in this section must be conducted by—

(1) A certificated repair station properly equipped to perform those functions and holding—

(i) A radio rating, Class III;

(ii) A limited radio rating appropriate to the make and model transponder to be tested;

(iii) A limited rating appropriate to the test to be performed;

(2) A holder of a continuous airworthiness maintenance program as provided in part 121 or §135.411(a)(2) of this chapter; or

(3) The manufacturer of the aircraft on which the transponder to be tested is installed, if the transponder was installed by that manufacturer.

§ 23.1325   Static pressure system.

(a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case connections must be so vented that the influence of airplane speed, the opening and closing of windows, airflow variations, moisture, or other foreign matter will least affect the accuracy of the instruments except as noted in paragraph (b)(3) of this section.

(b) If a static pressure system is necessary for the functioning of instruments, systems, or devices, it must comply with the provisions of paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) The design and installation of a static pressure system must be such that—

(i) Positive drainage of moisture is provided;

(ii) Chafing of the tubing, and excessive distortion or restriction at bends in the tubing, is avoided; and

(iii) The materials used are durable, suitable for the purpose intended, and protected against corrosion.

(2) A proof test must be conducted to demonstrate the integrity of the static pressure system in the following manner:

(i) Unpressurized airplanes. Evacuate the static pressure system to a pressure differential of approximately 1 inch of mercury or to a reading on the altimeter, 1,000 feet above the aircraft elevation at the time of the test. Without additional pumping for a period of 1 minute, the loss of indicated altitude must not exceed 100 feet on the altimeter.

(ii) Pressurized airplanes. Evacuate the static pressure system until a pressure differential equivalent to the maximum cabin pressure differential for which the airplane is type certificated is achieved. Without additional pumping for a period of 1 minute, the loss of indicated altitude must not exceed 2 percent of the equivalent altitude of the maximum cabin differential pressure or 100 feet, whichever is greater.

(3) If a static pressure system is provided for any instrument, device, or system required by the operating rules of this chapter, each static pressure port must be designed or located in such a manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the airplane encounters icing conditions. An antiicing means or an alternate source of static pressure may be used in showing compliance with this requirement. If the reading of the altimeter, when on the alternate static pressure system differs from the reading of the altimeter when on the primary static system by more than 50 feet, a correction card must be provided for the alternate static system.

(c) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, if the static pressure system incorporates both a primary and an alternate static pressure source, the means for selecting one or the other source must be designed so that—

(1) When either source is selected, the other is blocked off; and

(2) Both sources cannot be blocked off simultaneously.

(d) For unpressurized airplanes, paragraph (c)(1) of this section does not apply if it can be demonstrated that the static pressure system calibration, when either static pressure source is selected, is not changed by the other static pressure source being open or blocked.

(e) Each static pressure system must be calibrated in flight to determine the system error. The system error, in indicated pressure altitude, at sea-level, with a standard atmosphere, excluding instrument calibration error, may not exceed ±30 feet per 100 knot speed for the appropriate configuration in the speed range between 1.3 VS0with flaps extended, and 1.8 VS1with flaps retracted. However, the error need not be less than 30 feet.

(f) [Reserved]

(g) For airplanes prohibited from flight in instrument meteorological or icing conditions, in accordance with §23.1559(b) of this part, paragraph (b)(3) of this section does not apply.